Winners

Thank you to everyone who posted a comment on this website or submitted a photograph.

The Mead Gallery Curators have reviewed all of the submissions and have awarded the following entries with a framed print from the exhibition:

Photograph Submissions:

Responses to FSA photographs submissions:

  • Matthew Allen – for his response to Dorothea Lange’s Power farming displaces tenants from the land in the western dry cotton area. Childress County, Texas Panhandle
    [prize: Walker Evans Cabin]
  • SWPB from Balsall Common – for his/her response to Marion Post Wolcott’s Old man, near Camden, Alabama
    [prize: Arthur Rothstein  Sign]

Winning Entries
Katie Gilbert “Migrant workers” 2016. In response to Dorothea Lange “Migrant agricultural worker. Near Holtville, California” February 1937

Katie Gilbert “Migrant workers” 2016. In response to Dorothea Lange “Migrant agricultural worker. Near Holtville, California” February 1937

Harri Lewis (Untitled) 2016 "This is my collection of images taken in the Hillfields area of Coventry, typically this area is quite a deprived area of the city and I think my images reflect the human impressions left around this particular area showing how people live and how they have left these places after residing".

Harri Lewis (Untitled) 2016 “This is my collection of images taken in the Hillfields area of Coventry, typically this area is quite a deprived area of the city and I think my images reflect the human impressions left around this particular area showing how people live and how they have left these places after residing”.

Renata Juroszova (Untitled) 2016

Renata Juroszova (Untitled) 2016

MATTHEW ALLEN
12/10/2016 AT 10:30 PM
There’s something particularly haunting about this photograph. The bareness of the landscape, and the stark absence of features save the single house immediately sets it visually apart from much of the rest of the collection.Perhaps what makes it so captivating is the sense of loneliness it conveys. The emptiness of the fields, and the solitary abode seems to speak to the isolation of poverty in brutal fashion.Yet, for me, what makes this photograph so interesting is the real sense of contrast it captures. The humanity of the building is offset by the harshness of the terrain; the regular order of the land is upset by the centrality of the house; the deep greys of the land are counterpoised by the light hues of the sky.In an elegant, simple way this photo manages to capture the complex, ineffable, perplexing, and all too human aspects of poverty during the Great Depression – and in doing so speaks to the timeless contradictions of poverty.
————————————–
SPB, BALSALL COMMON

08/11/2016 AT 9:38 PM
For me this is one of the outstanding images of the Human Document. What is the “old man” thinking? What is on the paper in his hand? The hat is so old and worn it probably does nothing to keep out the weather, yet it symbolizes an attempt to dress properly and correctly even despite the obvious poverty. I must have spent more than 15 minutes looking at this image and came back to it two or three times during my time at the exhibition to try to answer those questions in my head. And coming back to it again now, nearly a week later I only just noticed the damaged left hand. In terms of composition of the image, your eye is drawn to the top half of the man by the fence perspective. This is such a powerful, raw image